There are very few filmmakers who can make a writer green with envy for their detailed frames and highly stylized approach. When the 2014 movie, The Grand Budapest Hotel, hit the screens to widespread critical acclaim, its director Wes Anderson was envied for the same. The movie cemented his status as a contemporary auteur and his previous works, The Royal Tenenbaums, Moonrise Kingdom, and Fantastic Mr. Fox aroused an accelerated enthusiasm.

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In this intimate talk with Ernie Manouse, Anderson talks about the mysterious connection between dreams and his filmmaking. Anderson hints at the filmmaking process as a complex, give and take between his imagination and the other collaborators. He calls the process as putting together scratch and claims his movies are not adapted from anything. He also reveals the writing process behind movies like the Moonrise Kingdom and how to collect the right things from the collaborators and place them in the right places.

Anderson says, to make a good movie, a filmmaker needs a lot of ideas, from all possible sources. In order to hold the viewers for some 90 or more minutes, the movie should pack with information, emotions and observations put together by the filmmaker. Anderson points at the futility of having a good plot at hand unless it is filled with great ideas gathered through research and imagination. No wonder Anderson’s movies are marked with vibrantly stylized and lavishly cartoonish visuals. 

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Anderson maintains a magical sense of wonder, often childlike, throughout his filmography, and that helps him to explore the parallel worlds hidden in his narratives. He presents those parallel worlds with the help of an odd combination of visuals and dialogues, which are detailed to nearly impossible levels, and every time we experience a Wes Anderson movie, we tread on something new.

Written By: Ragesh Dipu

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